Mini-Lectures
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Learning Frameworks (EDUC 1300) - Information Literacy  

A source of information literacy ideas and activities for instructors and students, both online and in face to face classes
Last Updated: Sep 17, 2011 URL: http://libguides.dcccd.edu/educ1300 Print Guide RSS UpdatesEmail Alerts

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Update for Instructors

I've begun updating the LibGuide. Sorry it took me a while to get back to this task. 

Check here for the more details! 

 

How to Use This LibGuide

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Mini-Lectures

 

DCCCD Libraries

View a map of our locations.

Brookhaven Library 
Reference: 972-860-4862
Circulation: 972-860-4863 
Monday through Thursday: 8 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.
Friday: 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Saturday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Sunday: Closed 
Campus map

Cedar Valley Library 
Reference: 972-860-8140
Circulation: 972-860-8140
Fall and Spring Hours
   Monday through Thursday: 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
   Friday: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
   Saturday: 9 a.m. to noon
   Sunday: Closed 
Winter and May Term Hours
   Monday through Friday: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
   Saturday: Closed
   Sunday: Closed
Summer Hours
   Monday through Thursday: 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
   Friday: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
   Saturday: Closed
   Sunday: Closed 
Campus map

Dallas TeleCollege Library 
888-468-4268 (in Dallas: 972-669-6400) 
Campus map

Eastfield Library 
Reference: 972-860-7174
Circulation: 972-860-7168 
Fall and Spring Hours
   Monday through Thursday: 7:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.
   Friday: 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
   Saturday: 9 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
   Sunday: Closed 
Winter and May Term Hours
   Monday through Friday: 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.
   Saturday: Closed
   Sunday: Closed
Summer Hours
   Monday through Thursday: 7:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.
   Friday: 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
   Saturday: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
   Sunday: Closed
Campus map

El Centro Library - Downtown Campus
Reference: 214-860-2174
Circulation: 214-860-2175
Fall and Spring Hours
   Monday through Thursday: 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.
   Friday: 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
   Saturday: 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
   Sunday: Noon to 3 p.m.
Summer Hours
   Monday through Thursday: 8 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
   Friday: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
   Saturday: Closed
   Sunday: Closed
Between Spring and Fall (including Maymester and Wintermester)
   Monday through Friday: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
   Saturday and Sunday: Closed 
Closed School Holidays
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El Centro Library - Bill Priest Campus 
Reference: 214-860-5780
Circulation: 214-860-5780
Monday through Friday: 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: Closed
Campus map

Mountain View Library
Reference: 214-860-8527
Circulation: 214-860-8669
Fall and Spring Hours
Monday through Thursday: 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Friday: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Saturday: 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Sunday: Closed 
Campus map

North Lake Library 
Reference: 972-273-3401
Circulation: 972-273-3400
Fall and Spring Hours
   Monday through Thursday: 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
   Friday: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
   Saturday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
   Sunday: Closed 
Winter and May Term Hours
   Monday through Friday: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
   Saturday: Closed
   Sunday: Closed
Summer Hours
   Monday through Thursday: 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
   Friday: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
   Saturday: Closed
   Sunday: Closed 
Campus map
 
Richland Library
Reference: 972-238-6082
Circulation: 972-238-6081
e-mail: richlandlibrary@dcccd.edu
Fall and Spring Hours
   Monday through Thursday: 8 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.
   Friday: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
   Saturday: 12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
   Sunday: Closed
Summer Hours
   Monday through Thursday: 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
   Friday: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
   Saturday: Closed
   Sunday: Closed
Campus map

 

Welcome to the Information Literacy LibGuide!

If you're an instructor you're at the right place.
If you're a student you need to go here:

 For Students Tab or
 

This site was originally developed for those who would be teaching the EDUC 1300 class online. However, as we got into the project, we realized it might well be a resource that face to face instructors could benefit from also. There may be small bias in favor of articulating the activites in a way that would be manageable in an online environment.  But we hope that can be adjusted to work for anyone. Let us know what you think!

 

3 Important Sources

In creating the information literacy module of the Learning Frameworks course we have been particularly informed by three Web sites, which we highly recommend and which are used as a basis for activities.

In each case the Web sites come from institutions of considerable reputation, a fact which is not unimportant for a module which itself is about careful selection of sources.

While time and space allow us only to access a portion of the superb material at each one, our hope is that EDUC 1300 instructors will find many ways to go beyond these activities. The Web is a huge part of how people update their knowledge. We all might as well get good at it.  

 

How EDUC 1300 Instructors Can Learn Information Literacy

Our Recommendation

  • Everyonethinks.org 
  • Read through all the pages on this site. Start with purpose in the upper left hand corner.

Then get acquainted with your campus librarians if you've not already done so.

Tutorial for Info Power (TIP) from the University of Wyoming is a much briefer alternative to IRIS and is also quite good (45 minutes).

PS. Another possibility would be to go through the screens of the University of Idaho Information Literacy Tutorial. There are easy multiple choice quizzes at the end of each module. And lots of screen based activities in the sidebar. Only a few parts are not relevant in the DCCCD (Like module 6: UI Catalog)


 

Tips for Reflecting on Information Literacy Activities

You may want to consider a modified version of the Discovery and Intention Journaling System as a method for 
encouraging students to reflect on their information Literacy activities. It consists of two steps and a simple journal
entry. The entries need not be long. And they can be shared in class or in groups.

  • Discovery. Write down something that you learned, relearned, or was reminded of. 
  • Intention.  Write down something that you intend to do, based on that discovery.

For example:

  • Discovery. I learned that one good method for locating experts is to look for the authors of relevant articles
    in subject encyclopedias then research the works of that author in periodical indexes and on the web.
  • Intention. Now that I know about that method, I'll use it on my upcoming history paper. 

It's as simple as that. 

You may even want to ask your students to create personal blogs (perhaps using Blogger) in which they enter discoveries and intentions about all aspects of their lives. It could also double as  research log, which is often recommended as a way to help researchers both become aware of their research habits and keep track ofthe myriad of details in a complex research project. 

 

Instructor Aids

We'll use this space to lend assistance in whatever form we learn works best. 

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